Links

| More

Useful websites for geography teachers

BBC: Dharavi Slum

Web address:    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/
                              spl/hi/world/06/dharavi_slum/html/
                              dharavi_slum_intro.stm
Keywords:          Urbanisation, Dharavi, Mumbai,
                              India, Slum, Squatter settlement
Key stages:
        KS3-P16


Brief description:

Contains interactive panoramic images with supporting text to explore living/working conditions for six different residents in the Dharavi slum, Mumbai. All images are high resolution and students can scroll 360 degrees through the image, zoom in etc.

Excellent resource to visualise living and working conditions in a slum, with clear links to many KS3, GCSE and A-level programmes of study, including detailed information about residents' efforts and strategies to improve their living conditions.

Use the tabs at the top to select appropriate person, then double click on the panoramic image to make full screen. The range of individuals may challenge students' preconceptions about the type of resident in Dharavi (e.g. includes aircraft engineer). Also exceptionally useful to show that Dharavi is a living and working slum (e.g. pottery worker).

Teaching ideas:

This could be displayed via a projector, but is best used by students on individual PCs.

Students can use the panoramic images to describe the living/working conditions for one resident, or to compare residents' living/working conditions. Accompanying text can be used to identify improvements to living conditions.

Could be used in conjunction with selected scenes from Slumdog Millionaire or the more informative Channel 4 documentary 'Slumming It'.

Be aware of:

Images may be slow to load with whole class use.

Reviewed by: Andy Newing, February 2011

 

BBC: Urban growth

Web address: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/world/06/urbanisation/html/urbanisation.stm
Keywords: Urbanisation, urban growth, world cities
Key stages: KS3-P16


Brief description:

Excellent interactive map from BBC News that can be used to explore urban growth from 1955 to 2015 (projected).

Drag the slider beneath the map to move from 1955 to 2015 and watch as the number and size of cities with a population over 5 million grows.

Hover over any individual city to reveal the total population. Use the pie and bar charts on the right hand side to explore changes in the proportions of urban/rural dwellers and the relative share of urban populations among each region.

Teaching ideas:

An excellent starter to a sequence of lessons exploring world cities or urbanisation in less developed regions - including the growth of slums.

Could be used via a projector for a whole class activity. Work forward from 1955 and students could guess which cities will grow the most or how the proportion of urban/rural population will change etc.

Students could use the map individually to explore the pattern of growth, perhaps focussing on a particular city or region and carrying out appropriate research into the factors behind or the impacts of urban population growth in that city/region.

Be aware of:

No known issues - the map's interactive functions should work on most school networks.

Reviewed by: Andy Newing, February 2011

 

Flightradar24

Web address:    www.flightradar24.com
Keywords:
          GIS, Travel, Distribution, Transport,
                              Aeroplane
Key stages:
        KS1-P16


Brief description:

  • A large sophisticated live database of air traffic
  • Works best over the UK and Europe
  • Shows the location of many aeroplanes indicating the aircraft type, flight number, altitude and flight path
  • It also locates key airports

Teaching ideas:

This is a fascinating live database which offers plenty of potential student activities. They could try to explain why certain areas have clusters of aeroplanes; try to identify the main routes; which airports are most used in Europe by which airlines; find out how the patterns change at different times of day; locate the plane that has traveled the furthest etc.

Be aware of:

This is best used after a demonstration has taken place. Pre-plan the key questions you wish the students to answer before they use the site. Check how fast you can access the website on your school network.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, February 2011

 

iGeology App

Web address: www.bgs.ac.uk/igeology
Keywords: iPhone, GPS, geology, physical, geography,
Key stages:
KS3-P16


Brief description:

iGeology is a new free app for iPhone, iPad and Android that lets you take a geological map of Britain with you in your pocket wherever you go. It has UK coverage and with most of the 1:50 000 scale maps of the UK you get quite a lot of detail. It is of course scaleable and it is so simple to use that anyone can learn more about the geology wherever they are.

A pinch grip allows the user to zoom in and out and touching the screen brings up a text box that gives information about both the superficial and the bedrock geology. I think it is detailed enough for all but the hardcore geologist.

There are several different ways of finding places. You can search by entering a place name or postcode, or locate yourself directly using the phone's in-built GPS and find out what the bedrock is you are standing on.

Teaching ideas:

I've used iGeology on several fieldtrips and it certainly makes geology come to life. Most recently I used it in the North Lakes on the WorldWise Challenge weekend. Even on the small screen of the iPhone it gives a clear overall picture and you can zoom in to identify smaller scale features such as the boundary between the Ordovician rocks around Skiddaw and Blencathra and the volcanics to the south as well as the zone of contact metamorphism.

It certainly helped the students to imagine the ocean, the subduction zone and the associated volcanoes which were active in the area over 450 million years ago. I'd recommend it as a useful addition to your fieldwork equipment for any trip outdoors.

  • Some waterfalls are caused by hard rocks overlying softer rocks. A classic example of this is High Force in Teesdale. Locate the waterfall and identify both the hard and soft rocks that are responsible for the formation. Can you find others that fit the pattern?
  • Use the location tool to find out what the rock type is under the school. Is there any evidence of the rock anywhere near school. If not, why not?
  • Use the app to study coastal areas (such as the Dorset coast) to explore how the geology determines the shape of the bays and headlands
  • Look at the geology map of the UK. What large scale patterns can be seen?
  • Use the app to explore an area such as the Weald or South Downs prior to visiting. Does the geology impact on the shape of the land, the building materials, the farming?

Be aware of:

Some users report an issue with screenshots being automatically saved to their phone's photo gallery so it may be worth keeping an eye on that.

GPS is required for the best functionality when out in the field.

The app can be slow to load.

Reviewed by: John Lyon, May 2012

 

Live train map for the London Underground

Web address:    http://traintimes.org.uk/map/tube
Keywords:          GIS, London, Urban Geography,
                              Transport, Commute, Networks
Key stages:
        KS2-P16


Brief description:

  • A live GIS resource which shows the movement of underground trains in London
  • Trains can be identified and seen in 'real time' and plotted on a variety of maps
  • The site links with the National Rail system map where some trains are plotted and individual live station train information boards can be viewed

Teaching ideas:

Where and why is the density of trains highest and when? Does their frequency decrease from one specific location? How is their frequency related to land use? Students should be asked how they would use this information which is designed for mobile phones.

Be aware of:

This is a live database and does take a little time to load. It should also be refreshed from time to time. The National Railway network does not allow all stations to be selected and does not show all services on the map but it is good for showing any station information board. Check how fast you can access the website on your school network.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, February 2011

 

MarineTraffic.com

Web address: www.marinetraffic.com
Keywords:
GIS, shipping, distribution, transport, port, trade
Key stages:
KS1-P16


Brief description:

  • A large sophisticated live GIS database which plots the global movement of marine traffic
  • Individual ships are identified and described, their routes and the track of their past route plotted.
  • Areas can be selected and zoomed into
  • Graphs and fact sheets can also be generated

Teaching ideas:

This is a fascinating, sophisticated and yet very accessible live database which can be interrogated in many different ways. At a continental level the question of where and why more ships are found in some areas and not others can be tackled. The Horn of Africa shows no ships - why?

Select a particular port and ask which ships are in it and where they came from. Choose a cruise liner such as Queen Victoria and find out which destinations she has visited.

The route of a ship can be checked every lesson or its course plotted over a few days - pair students with different vessels.

The marine trade of a nation could be investigated.

Be aware of:

This is a complex and sophisticated live database but it is very easy to use. It is suggested that students are shown some of its more advanced functions after they have explored it themselves. Check how fast you can access the website on your school network.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, February 2011

 

Old Bailey Online

Web address: www.oldbaileyonline.org
Keywords:
GIS, crime, London, urban geography, location
Key stages:
KS4-P16


Brief description:

  • A large database of historical crimes which were prosecuted at the Old Bailey in London
  • The crimes are described and plotted on a variety of historic maps of London
  • The database may be searched in many ways to show patterns of different crimes

Teaching ideas:

This is a fascinating database which can be used in a variety of ways. It is probably best to focus on one specific area or crime. Are some areas more prone to one specific crime - why? Where did most of the murders take place? Why? Is it the same now? Why? Why not? A great opportunity for creativity!

Be aware of:

This is a complex and sophisticated database which is best used after a demonstration. It has a powerful search facility and several different historic maps of London can be selected for the data to be plotted onto. Test the site on your school network before using it to see how long it takes to load. Beware that transcripts of crimes are in the language used at the time.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, February 2011

 

Police.uk

Web address: www.police.uk
Keywords:
GIS, crime, location, urban geography, UK
Key stages:
KS2-P16


Brief description:

  • This is a simple database which plots different types of crime from an area to a street level
  • Individual locations are not plotted to safeguard identity
  • A postcode is entered into the opening screen from which a map of the area selected is displayed with the different types of crime tabulated

Teaching ideas:

Compare various urban areas against each other or compare urban and rural areas in terms of different types of crime. The data can be collected and related to the factors that might promote a specific crime in an area - what are these factors? How can these crimes be prevented?

You could look at crime rates where the students live or in the area around your school.

Use Google Street View to add an extra dimension to your explorations.

Be aware of:

This is an easy to use GIS database. Be prepared with some 'good' postcodes e.g. Baker Street London - NW1 6XE, Downing Street SW1 2AA and some other examples collected in advance. Check how fast you can access the website on your school network.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, February 2011

 

Poodwaddle

Web address: www.poodwaddle.com
Keywords:
Demography, population, data, disease, change, time, calculators, health
Key stage:
KS3-P16


Brief description:

This dashboard site is a gateway to many resources from world clocks and earth clocks to the number of people being born and crimes being committed. It is an ideal starting point and encourages students to ask a variety of questions about data, how it is sourced and how accurate it might be. It produces some astounding statistics most of which are shown by clocks. The site also provides tools such as calculators, countdown clocks, temperature converters etc.

Teaching ideas:

This resource has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for changes. The 'birth clock' can be started at the beginning of a lesson, then minimised and checked at the end of the lesson. Different types of mortality can be contrasted between different regions of the world. Just to have the world clock displayed often creates many questions.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use others just what you were looking for!

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, March 2012

 

TED

Web address:    www.ted.com
Keywords:
          Talks, Podcasts, Technology,
                              Entertainment, Design
Key stages:
        KS4-P16


Brief description:

TED is a non-profit devoted to 'Ideas Worth Spreading'. It started in 1984 as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: technology, entertainment and design. Since then its scope has become ever broader.

The award-winning TEDTalks video site brings together the world's most fascinating thinkers and doers, who are challenged to give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes or less. More than 900 TEDTalks are now available, with more added each week. All of the talks are subtitled in English, and many are subtitled in various languages. These videos are released under a Creative Commons license, so they can be freely shared and reposted.

The website provides a wealth of talks that can be used in many different ways. The 18 minute format means from an educational point of view they are concise and can be put into many different school lesson lengths fairly easily. There is a great range of geographical themed videos including talks by Professor Hans Rosling of Gapminder and Al Gore.

Teaching ideas:

There are many topics you could use TED resources in. The clips are good for getting students engaged in critical thinking or considering topics from a philosophical point of view.

You could use the TEDTalks format in class but perhaps with a shorter time than their standard 18 minutes. This would be useful for EPQ type presentations, for students who are developing an interest in a particular subject or for university interview preparation.

You could even look at the TEDx events and consider planning an event yourself.

Be aware of:

Talks are continually being uploaded.

Ensure you watch them before you show them to your pupils as there can be a range of topics and language used.

Make sure TED isn't blocked by your school's security settings.

Reviewed by: Bob Lang, December 2011

 

Census 2011 Help to Shape Tomorrow

Web address: www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/census     /2011/index.html
Keywords:
Britain, Census, Population, Employment, Economy,    Social Areas
Key stages:
KS3-P16


Brief description:

This resource is based on the 2011 census of England and Wales and contains some of the results. Some of these are shown in maps and others are in detailed tables. The resource provides an up to date picture of many aspects of England and Wales from the population to the economy, and information about the key changes that have taken place.

Teaching ideas:

This resource is so big it can be used in a variety of ways. For example a map which shows the changes in the Small Area Population can be found by typing in a post code, and the map displaying results from the 2011 census can be compared with a 2001 version. Parameters can be changed so the map displays different information from a drop down menu. Different areas can also be compared.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them and select the best examples to demonstrate or for students to use.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, November 2012

 

Woodland Trust – Tree Dating- How to date a tree!

Web address: www.ancient-tree-hunt.org.uk/ancienttrees/findingthem/recognising
Keywords:
Trees, environment, environmental change

Key stages:
KS1-P16


Brief description:

This Woodland Trust page is part of a larger site providing basic information about how to estimate the age of a tree without using dendrochronology or cutting it down and counting the rings. It includes both simple and complex calculation tables to estimate the age of a tree at varying degrees of accuracy. Variables include the type of tree, its specific location, micro-climate, soils and how it might have been interfered with by human impact.

Teaching ideas:

This resource lends itself to active team fieldwork, from measuring and assessing location to basic arithmetic. The age of trees can indicate an interesting pattern, raise a number of geographical questions and can be plotted on a GIS Map.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, November 2012

 

Ready

Web address: www.ready.gov
Keywords:
Natural disasters, protection and recovery, volcanic activity, earthquakes, tidal wave, drought, hurricane, pandemics, terrorist, disasters, disaster recovery, emergency precautions

Key stages:
KS2-P16


Brief description:

A large United States Government website to prepare people for different types of disasters. It is easy to navigate and contains a children's section. It explains a number of different environments and the threats they pose and advises on precautions people should take and how to deal with a particular disaster. It is designed as an emergency planning site by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and contains a variety of video clips. The site also features downloadable publications.

Teaching ideas:

The website can be used in many different ways. Natural disasters can be analysed individually or compared with others. Students can also collect information to produce their own protection pack for a natural disaster threat. They might consider how this information could be made available to those who have not got access to the website or cannot speak English. The Spanish version of this site is called Listo.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, November 2012

 

Mapping Our World

Web address: www.oxfam.org.uk/education/resources/mapping_our_world/
Keywords:
Continents, countries, projections , centered maps, upside down maps

Key stages:
KS2-3


Brief description:

An interactive website which uses maps and globes to improve pupils’ understanding of the world. Winner of a Geographical Association Gold Award and a BAFTA award for primary learning. Mapping Our World enables pupils to flatten a globe, turn a map into a globe and merge different map projections together.

There are structured lesson activities which include teachers’ notes. The website supports the geography curriculum and is ideal for bringing a global approach to citizenship, PSE and ICT.

Teaching ideas:

Each lesson is split into three parts and includes comprehensive teacher notes. The instructions are clear and one can restart, go back and end in a plenary session.

Be aware of:

A set of atlases and a whiteboard is required for these exercises. The resource is aimed at children aged 8-14. There is also a version for younger children aged 4-7 called Your World, My World, which explores the lives of four children from Etopia, Brazil, Russia and India, and is a good introduction to global learning.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

National Heritage

Web address: http://list.english-heritage.org.uk/mapsearch.aspx

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/

Keywords: Ancient monuments, listed buildings, landmarks, place names

Key stages:
KS2-4


Brief description:

A valuable resource for exploring the heritage of your local area. The website has detailed information about the historical environment including research, policies, archives and collections. You can view an area in great detail and search for particular features such as ancient monuments or listed buildings.

Teaching ideas:

You can book a discovery visit at http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/education/discovery-visits. Many industrial revolution buildings are listed and detailed, as well as historic vernacular and important buildings. Your class could explore the source of building materials, the infrastructure from when they were built and changes in land use over time.

Be aware of:

The English Heritage resources are spread over six different websites, links to which are at the bottom of the map page. For example, 9,000 images can be viewed here, and 300,000 images from lavatories to historic houses and bridges can be viewed here.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

Our Africa

Web address: www.our-africa.org

Keywords: Children, villages, daily life, landscapes, health, games, climate, agriculture, wildlife, stories, maps, products, music, culture, food, crafts

Key stages:
KS1-3


Brief description:

The Our Africa website is an evolving collection of videos of daily life in Africa as seen through the eyes of young people across the African continent. As well as giving a unique insight into Africa, the free resources can be used in the classroom in support of the national curriculum. Each country listed on the website is split into a series of topics with accompanying videos.

Teaching ideas:

There are detailed suggestions for role play and a curriculum map based on the 2007 key stage 3. The scenarios enhance students understanding of different places and enables them to use geographical terminology to describe them. Students can also explore countries at different stages of development and learn about the issues faced at each stage, and their implications at a global level.

Be aware of:

This is a charity for orphans so the bleaker side of life is shown alongside the successes. Not every country in Africa is featured nor does every country have a video clip.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

Gough Map

Web address: www.goughmap.org/

Keywords: Great Britain. map, digital, contexts, history, place names

Key stages:
KS2-3


Brief description:

The website presents an interactive, searchable edition of the Gough Map, the first map of Britain, together with contextual material, a blog and information about the project and the Language of Maps colloquium. It is essentially an academic map with medieval imagery.

Teaching ideas:

The website provides a historical context to cities and towns in Britain; their original names and how people described them in medieval times. It is possible to enter a modern place name (best to browse by initial e.g. G will bring up all medieval places beginning with G and a thumbnail of the map area) and compare old maps of medieval settlements to the present time.

Be aware of:

On the maps south is on the right and north is on the left. Rivers and coastlines are crudely drawn. It is not an easy website to navigate, and it is best viewed on Internet Explorer 8 and Windows 7.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles and Tina Horler, November 2012

 

Mapping for Change

Web address: www.mappingforchange.org.uk

Keywords: Maps, communities, empowerment, sustainable

Key stages:
KS2-3


Brief description:

Mapping for Change supports the development of sustainable communities. It specialises in providing participatory mapping services to communities, voluntary sector organisations, local authorities and developers. Their work has a strong focus on engaging and empowering communities to make positive transformations to their localities, by producing maps to support a funding application or to develop an online interactive map to engage with communities as part of a consultation process. Examples include school programmes, food growing and distribution and sustainable tourism. They use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and mapping technology to produce their maps.

A community map can show proposals for new plans or regeneration activities for any area and enable both those living in affected areas and those involved in the plans to get a clearer idea of local concerns and impacts.

Teaching ideas:

Click on the Projects tab and select a project. Each project can be used as a case study for exploring topics such as air pollution, climate change or community issues.

If you wish to add information to a map you will need to register (click the 'add content' button beside your selected map). Then you can add in any of the categories which appeals to you. Each symbol has a title and a second click brings up an information box.

Be aware of:

This is a relatively new venture and most of the projects are based in London, but over time more areas will be covered.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles and Tina Horler, November 2012

 

OS Open Data

Web address: www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite
Keywords:
Digital maps, photographs, local area mapping

Key stages:
KS2-3


Brief description:

You can download maps on a scale up to 1:10,000 (Street View) or collect a list of locations appearing on a scale up to 1:50,000 (LandRanger). There is also a feature to convert postcodes into grid references. Street View shows street level detail and maps can be customised to highlight particular features.

Teaching ideas:

For Primary the 1:10,000 scale is ideal for making base maps and plotting anything from students likes and dislikes of an area to exploring land use.

Be aware of:

All downloadable files are supplied as .zip archives.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

Quik Maps

Web address: www.quikmaps.com
For a longer explanation of how Quik maps work: www.geography.org.uk/cpdevents/onlinecpd/younggeographersgolocal/introducingquikmaps/

Keywords: Map additions, Google, map symbols, map labels

Key stages:
KS2-3


Brief description:

I'm very impressed with this website. Setting up an account is free and the maps take seconds to produce. Video and images are embedded using standard HTML tags in the marker window. Tip - make sure you are creating a map while logged in as a member and ensure the cursor isn't visible in the window before attempting to save your map. The user-friendly nature of this website makes it ideal for students to create maps of their local or personal geographies.

Teaching ideas:

My year five class made a good map using the aerial and hybrid map views to display their likes and pass-time activities in the local area using photographs of specific points. See demonstrations of activities using this website here and here. This GA pdf guide explains how to insert photographs on the map.

Be aware of:

You are required to set up a free account and having a gallery of photos to plot on a map is useful.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

Young ShelterBox

Web address: www.youngshelterbox.org

Keywords: Disaster, shelter, home, community, global

Key stages:
KS1-3


Brief description:

Young ShelterBox is an international disaster relief charity. Their website shares what they have discovered about the world and provides tools to help in the classroom. There are challenges for schools, free multi-media resources, stories and activity ideas. Topics include tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, volcanic eruptions and conflicts. Out of school activities are suggested in the Scouts area.

Teaching ideas:

Find information about recent disasters and establish links with other parts of the world and community projects. Link with a school in a disaster area through the British Council or ShelterBox, and use the maps on the site to find out more about the geography, people and culture of each disaster site.

Be aware of:

The focus of the site is fundraising for disaster areas. By organising or taking part in an event that raises money for ShelterBox, you will be directly providing aid for people affected by disasters all over the world. A great thing about ShelterBox is that every box bears its own unique number, so it is possible to track your donations.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

Wordle

Web address: www.wordle.net/

Keywords: Words

Key stages:
KS1-3


Brief description:

Wordle is a tool for generating 'word clouds' from text. The clouds give a greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. You can tweak your clouds with different fonts, layouts and color schemes. You can print your Wordle images or save them to the Wordle gallery to share with others.

Teaching ideas:

You can use the website with story cubes, stories or poems to find the key words and develop glossaries. The Wordle Users group is also helpful.

Be aware of:

You may encounter problems when using the site with Java script in Internet Explorer. Wordle advises Internet Explorer users to download Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

Earth Hour

Web address: earthhour.wwf.org.uk/

Keywords: Ecosystem, sustainability, saving energy, food, fuel, fresh air, deforestation, endangered species, climate change

Key stages:
All KS


Brief description:

A campaign by WWF using geographical knowledge to demonstrate global matters and issues. Earth Hour is an annual event which started in 2011, where for one hour millions of participants from around the world turn off their lights. The website has information which can be used for teaching climate change.

Teaching ideas:

The website resources can be used to introduce lessons on sustainability, school gardening, the impact of natural disasters and the global consequences of industrial and individual actions. The site can also be used to enhance ICT skills. There is an interactive map and practical tips for getting involved with Earth Hour, a tool to measure ones carbon footprint and discussions about geographical topics such as climate change and climate extremes.

Reviewed by: Rachel Bowles, November 2012

 

Canal Plan

Web address: canalplan.eu/
Keywords: Britain, canals, waterways, environment, transport
Key stages: KS2-P16

Brief description:

This resource is based upon the canal systems of the United Kingdom and Europe. It is a ‘live’ site with different information flagged up each day. It provides basic maps, directions and photographs of canals and up to date information for canal users.

Teaching ideas:

This resource is so big it can be used in a variety of different and specific ways. For example it could be used for planning actual or virtual field work in a local or foreign area or as a method for looking at land use besides the canal. It enables students to relate actual maps to thematic maps and photographs and includes directions and distances. Students could produce their own route maps from home to school or for a familiar journey and illustrate them with photographs.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them and select the best examples to demonstrate or for students to use.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, May 2013

 

How stuff works

Web address: www.howstuffworks.com
Keywords: Physical geography, weather, earthquakes, volcanic activity, hazards, disasters
Key stages: KS2-P16

Brief description:

This resource consists of a gateway or search page which students or teachers can use to find out how things work. It provides a wealth of information on many physical geography topics. It is easy to navigate and the resources are varied and can be selected for a specific attainment level. Most explanations include definitions and animations.

Teaching ideas:

This resource like many has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for new clips and ideas. The website provides good video clips and animations which could be used in class.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them and select the best examples to demonstrate or for students to use.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, May 2013

 

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology

Web address: www.ceh.ac.uk
Keywords: Physical Geography; Ecology; Hydrology; Rivers; River Flow; Climate
Key stages: All key stages

Brief description:

This is a gateway site to a range of ecological and hydrological topics located in the British Isles. It provides a wealth of located data both current and historic showing for example the details, photographs and data from a range of river discharge sites around Britain.

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for changes and new materials. The site might be used in many different ways. For example it might be used allow students to investigate the present and historic flows of different rivers with different catchments characteristics over time and compare them.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for!.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, November 2014

 

Cadcorp – Map Express

Web address: www.cadcorp.com/products/free-mapping-software
Keywords: GIS; mapping; analysis; spatial data
Key stages: 4-5

Brief description:

Map Express is a free-to-use desktop product in the Cadcorp SIS product suite. It can be used to read many data formats – GIS, CAD, web, and database - directly, and without translation. Like other similar web-based GIS programmes you begin with an entirely blank canvas, but there are very useful and easy to follow tutorial videos on the website to guide you in how to get started.

Teaching ideas:

It comes with a limited amount of pre-loaded/downloadable demo maps and data based on Exeter and on the South Coast of the UK. Map Express offers the following geo-processing functionality: spatial querying, attribute querying, tabular visualisation, statistical analysis, advanced thematic mapping, 3D visualisation, map publishing in Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF), and map printing. Map Express can be deployed as a completely stand-alone desktop GIS. It is well suited to hosting OS open source downloaded base maps and virtually any data/Census statistics you may wish to analyse from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), so it is well suited to lessons on case studies and regional comparisons.

Be aware of:

Again, like other web-based GIS programmes, it seems like it tends to be updated fairly frequently, so it is a good idea to check regularly to see if they have released a new version as this might not always be obvious or communicated directly to the user.

 

Detroit - Economic development, decline and regeneration

Web address:

http://detroitfuturecity.com

Population:

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/26/2622000.html

http://detroit.areaconnect.com/statistics.htm

Crime rates, Detroit and USA:

http://detroit.areaconnect.com/statistics.htm

Keywords: Detroit, USA, Economic Development, Urbanisation Change
Key stages: 4 and 5

Brief description:

This is a list of Web sites which provide historical and up to date information on economic and consequential social change in greater Detroit USA. Once the centre of the United States Car and Music Industries - the founding location for Ford - Detroit has seen considerable economic and social decline and bankruptcy in recent years but now has ambitions to overcome these trends. The web sites listed provide both economic and social data often related to specific locations and areas within the city so as well as illustrating the fluctuating economic and social well being of the city they also illustrate the considerable contrasts between areas within greater Detroit.

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for new clips and ideas. The web sites and others can be used in a variety of different ways. One suggestion might be to give the students a scenario that they are moving with their family to greater Detroit - which area would be the best one to relocate to considering its location in relation to 'downtown' Detroit, crime rates, ethnic composition and economic growth together with the price of real estate - houses.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for! Some of these clips have an American context.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, May 2015

 

How are National Censuses done and what are the issues?

Keywords: Population, Demography, USA, Censuses, Ethnicity
Key stages: 3-5

Video and audio files: http://www.census.gov/multimedia/www/videos/stats_in_action.php  

Easy stats: http://www.census.gov/easystats/

Brief description:

This is a list of Web sites all to be found on the main US Census Web site. The 'Video' section of the Web site provides some very interesting material about how a census is designed, conducted and what it for. One video clip challenges students to write a census taking into account the various ethnic groups within the American community - and what words might or might not be used. The 'easy stats' section provides easy access to all types of statistical data which it will tabulate, graph and map depending upon the tab selected.

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for new clips and ideas. The web sites and others can be used in a variety of different ways. One example given in the clip is for students to devise a census for their own class group - this illustrates the challenges faced by collecting data about larger populations and could also focus on when the data has been collected what it could be used for.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for! Some of these clips have an American context.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, May 2015

 

Air Quality Real Time Mapping

Web address: aqicn.org
Keywords:
Physical Geography; Meteorology; Air Quality; Mapping; Pollution; Environment; GIS
Key stages: KS3/4/5

Brief description:

This site provides a gateway to the air quality information for a number of select locations in Britain and around the world. It shows graphs for particulates, ozone levels, Nitrous Oxide, Sulphur Dioxide, pressure, temperature and humidity for specific times including minimum and maximum ranges for the current time and for the past two days and forecasts levels for the next three days. The site covers 60 countries in the world and can be used in seven different languages!

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for changes and new materials. The site might be used in many different ways. For example it might be used to allow students to compare different levels of different pollutants and different locations through time either in one country – urban compared with rural or different countries with different stages of development. It is important that students who wish to use the site for detailed work understand the different types of pollutants – how they are caused and the possible consequences they have.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for! The site can be used at different levels of sophistication by different levels of students.

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, January 2016

 

Air Quality Mapping

Web address: www.londonair.org.uk/london/asp/annualmaps.asp
Keywords:
Physical Geography; Meteorology; Air Quality; Mapping; Pollution; Environment; GIS; London
Key stages: KS2/3/4 and above

Brief description:

This resource has been produced by King’s College, London and provides a map of London which can be searched to show pollution trends and the contribution different pollutants make. It has links to live pollution monitoring sites and enables ‘hot spots’ of pollution to be found. . It is important that students who wish to use the site for detailed work understand the different types of pollutants – how they are caused and the possible consequences they have.

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for changes and new materials. The site might be used in many different ways. One idea would be to ask students to locate the sites that have most and least pollution concentrations at the same time of day or night and assess what the key differences in the urban environment are at these sites to give such large differences. What would the impact of living in these different locations be?

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for!

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, January 2016

 

United Kingdom Air Quality Resource – Defra, UK

Web address: uk-air.defra.gov.uk
Keywords: 
Physical Geography; Meteorology; Air Quality; Mapping; Pollution; Environment; GIS; United Kingdom
Key stages: KS2/3/4 and above

Brief description:

This comprehensive resource has been produced by Defra and provides live pollution information and forecasts with the latest measurements for 300 interactive monitoring sites located on an interactive map of the United Kingdom. The map and information may be filtered from selecting or deselecting from a table on the same page as the map – for different pollutants such as heavy metals, particulates, hydrocarbons. It is important that students who wish to use the site for detailed work understand the different types of pollutants – how they are caused and the possible consequences related to them.

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for changes and new materials. The site might be used in many different ways. One idea would be to ask students to compare sites of different types of road network in urban and in country areas.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for!

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, January 2016

 

Air Quality – City Lab

Web address: www.citylab.com/weather/2015/09/mapping-the-worlds-air-pollution-in-real-time/406411/
Keywords:
Physical Geography; Meteorology; Air Quality; Mapping; Pollution; Environment; GIS
Key stages: KS2/3/4 and above

Brief description:

This resource is a gateway site to a number of urban issues including air pollution. Although the site does contain some commercial adverts it does allow the user to see air pollution on a global as well as on a regional and local scale. The interactive map allows locations to be selected and information on air quality to be seen. It is important that students who wish to use the site for detailed work understand the different types of pollutants – how they are caused and the possible consequences related to them.

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for changes and new materials. The site might be used in many different ways. One way of using this site might be for students to assess and question the global or regional patterns of air pollution and how the pattern might be accounted for – both for areas of high air pollution and low. What are the consequences of the findings and how might air pollution and its consequences be mitigated?

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for!

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, January 2016

 

Graces Guide

Web address: www.gracesguide.co.uk
Keywords: Human Geography; Industry; Industrial Development; United Kingdom; Economic Development
Key stages: KS2/3/4 and above

Brief description:

This resource is a gateway site to a large resource base of United Kingdom’s Industries and famous entrepreneurs – answering question like why industries grew where they did and how and why they developed. The site, put together by volunteers uses a number of historic sources. The site has links to other sites and resources including the National Archives.

Teaching ideas:

This resource, like many, has a changing focus so needs to be checked regularly for changes and new materials. The site might be used in many different ways. One way to use this site might be to look up local industries to see how they developed and whether any specific factors were important in their development or none.

Be aware of:

View and research the site and the materials with some care before using them - some of the materials will be unsuitable for educational use while others will be just what you were looking for!

Reviewed by: Peter Fox, January 2016

 

Comment on this page

Comments made by GA members appear instantly and don't require security words to be entered - make sure you're logged in! Guest comments will be sent to a moderator for approval.

1 Comment

Guest

AlisonP Guest

Although the TED talks are blocked on our school network they are available to download and will then play

Join the GA

For professional journals, huge discounts on publications and CPD and online access to member only resources.

Join now
  • Bodhi360's Info-Training Packages
  • Apply now to mark GCSE and A level geography
  • British Red Cross
  • AAG
Receive our email newsletters

Sign up to our email newsletter for all the latest news and updates throughout the year.